Pumpkins drawn in ink

Inktober 2016 Tools

At the beginning of Inktober I was really hoping I would stick to just the tools included in the Inktober Artsnacks box, but that didn’t happen haha. Here is a quick overview of some of the inking tools that I used the most over the challenge. Other than maybe the No. 7, there isn’t anything too crazy in my lineup πŸ™‚

Since I already had a bit of a collection of inking tools to use I figured rather than make this list beforehand and try to guess what I would be using all month or being very strict with my materials, that I would throw this list together afterwards. These are not ALL that I used, but just what got used the most.

Went ahead and drew a different pumpkin with each tool to show off their line quality.

Micron Pens*

My first “serious” ink pens. These felt-tipped pens get used in almost all of my pieces because they give me a lot of tight line control and all of the different sizes make varying my line thickness much easier. Almost all of the little, tiny lines in my pictures can usually be traced back to these, with my 005 being the most used of the set for all super small details.

Dip PenΒ (Nib Holder* and Cartoonist Nibs*)

My newest and most interesting inking aquisition! In the past I have only ever used dip pens for journaling, most of my old nibs are all very flexible, so I wouldn’t have thought I would be seeing my most fine lines ever coming from one of these. It blew me away pretty hard to see the line variance I could get from the Cartoonist nibs, mainly just how TINY my lines are with this.

I’ve been using Sumi ink with the dip pen and have no complaints. The ink dries quickly when I don’t pile it onto the paper and when it is completely dry it hasn’t smudged or run when used with other wet media like Copic markers or ink washes.

Pentel Pocket Brush Pen*

Pretty much my favorite pen of all time. Been using this pen for about 5 years now and I adore it. AND I am still using my original pen bought 5 years ago, since you can get new ink cartridges for these. This brush pen has withstood a lot of abuse from me and has held up very well. Love the ink in this since for the amount of ink that gets put down onto the paper it still dries reasonably quickly and without smudging after it is completely dry.

Kuretake No. 7 Brush Pen*

It is called a brush pen, but it is really a felt-tipped marker. That being said, it was easily my second-most used pen this month. Laying down thin lines is easy with the nice point the tip comes to and the felt tip actually made this feel like a much easier version of a brush pen. It has a lot more line control, so I don’t get the somewhat unsteady-looking lines that the Pentel brush pen gives me and everything is very smooth.

Hybrid Technica Gel Pen*

Surprisingly great for fine details, but for line variance you’ll of course have to go over something a few times. So this mostly gets used when I am looking for really thin and uniform lines, since felt tips are squishy and the give some amount of line variance that I am not always looking for.

Paint Brushes

Another first for me this past month was using paint brushes to ink with. And I have to say for me personally, I could take or leave it. There are a few cartoonist brushes I would very much like to try out still, but as for the brush I was using this month.. eh. I’d rather use the brush pen and not have to dip. I am also pretty sure I ruined a $30 sable brush trying to get all of the ink out of the bristles πŸ˜› Boo.

I will be sticking with my cheaper Grace Art brushes* from now on for inking until I get a brush specifically built for it.

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